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Tessa’s take on India
April 15th, 2010 by Tessa

India.

Where do you start?

New Delhi

We started in the capital, New Delhi. A city of cows, honking cars and assorted laundry boiling under a haze of smog- a virtual assortment of chocolates from a brand that my mom doesn’t like.

“AND THIS IS THE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT!?!”- Kate Wells.

It is true that their largest, and in fact, capital’s airport seems to be in the middle of a mass of tented houses and slums (for lack of better words). The parking lot was, in fact, a dirt parking lot and we were all in a somewhat temperamental mood after having to haggle and yell at the taxi drivers.

Now, it is very well to keep in mind that I have a VERY strong dislike of Indian food. And when I say dislike I mean that I seriously dislike it. So we set off into the world of India with our 4 backpacks, some tea, and a large container of peanut butter.

We passed Indian food restaurant after restaurant, and eventually came to our “Pearl Plaza” hotel. We hiked up the first floor with our back packs -then the second, then the third, then the 4th until we arrived panting on the 5th floor, where we dropped our backpacks into the room with a sigh. No phone, no pool, no pets (and no internet) had me feeling like King of the Road.

Agra

~See car accident post.~

Jodhipur

We stood at the “from Delhi” carousal a couple days later in Jodhipur. I had gone in 9 months from looking at the sidewalk and thinking “that is Japanese ABC gum” to thinking about how we had ABC gum at home and how I missed the sidewalk in front of our house. It’s strange what you start to miss. I could also look at the bottom of my flip flops or keens and think about how the ABC gum there was like the ABC gum at home.

It didn’t help much that the thing I was looking at on the floor was probably not ABC gum, so I followed my parents out the door with my backpack over my shoulder.

One of about 20 old temple buildings in the garden - pretty cool!  There were a bunch of drunk guys there that kept trying to get us to have barbeque with them - it was just like Hance Park back in Phoenix!

One of about 20 old temple buildings in the garden - pretty cool! There were a bunch of drunk guys there that kept trying to get us to have barbeque with them - it was just like Hance Park back in Phoenix!

The garden was CRAWLING with monkeys.  It freaked Phoebe out a little after "the great monkey attack" in Kyoto, but they had little babies so Phoebe mellowed out.

The garden was CRAWLING with monkeys. It freaked Phoebe out a little after "the great monkey attack" in Kyoto, but they had little babies so Phoebe mellowed out.

Eager to get on with our tour of the city as soon as possible so that we could go visit my Aunt’s relatives in Idar, we jumped to-it and wedged in a trip to a garden on the first afternoon before going to our hotel.

Getting a tour guide is like picking a straw. You could end up with the short end of the deal or you could end up with the longest piece. I now understand why our family is not a tour group family. After just a day of going to three sites and being told everything three times, I was only a straw away from strangling the guide. I found that nodding enthusiastically and smiling usually got me points for good behavior though.

Me in front of the Jaswant Mausoleum.  I will refain from further comment.

Me in front of the Jaswant Mausoleum. I will refain from further comment.

And now I will address the "caste" system in India.  Cultural tradition or not - its is just plain STUPID.  These little boys should have been in school, but they aren't allowed to go to school because they were born into the "musician" cast.  Ah, whatever!

And now I will address the "caste" system in India. Cultural tradition or not - its is just plain STUPID. These little boys should have been in school, but they aren't allowed to go to school because they were born into the "musician" cast. Ah, whatever!

The Majahrah back in the 1930's made a "poverty prevention plan" by building the largest palace in the world.  Now a third is the current Majahraj's house, a third museum, and third 5-star hotel... hum...

The Majahrah back in the 1930's made a "poverty prevention plan" by building the largest palace in the world. Now a third is the current Majahraj's house, a third museum, and third 5-star hotel... hum...

This is a picture from on top of the fort (that is really high up on a mountain).  Johipur is also called the "Blue City" because of all the houses that are painted blue.  They say that the blue houses are for the Brahmin class, but our tour guide said that's a rumor.

This is a picture from on top of the fort (that is really high up on a mountain). Johipur is also called the "Blue City" because of all the houses that are painted blue. They say that the blue houses are for the Brahmin class, but our tour guide said that's a rumor.

Udipur

By this time, I liked India’s hidden (possibly buried under the rubble and trash) charm and mom was starting to get used to it. Our hotel was a small, surprisingly stylish building down a small alley. We loved the Kaeser Palace!!!!! It was owned by a man, his wife and his little brother named Lucky. Lucky was probably one of the first people who was eager to help us who we didn’t know of before the trip in India. He gave my mom the right amount to pay for camel shoes, helped us tremendously with our room arrangement, and directed us to the nearest internet café when the internet was down.

In that city we also met some children. Their father worked at the shop down the way and their house was a three room apartment(ish) down the alley closer to the lake. One of the girls was 9 and the other was 15. Bittu and I did henna, walked around town and folded origami.

Our friends in Udipur

Our friends in Udipur

Udupur is also famous for its palace on the lake that you can see from our hotel. Mom had big plans to go and eat lunch there like it advertised on their website. So we stalked off to where the tuk-tuk driver told us the ferry was. Chaos rolled out like a nice carpet onto the floor. Mom got in an argument with the guards who wouldn’t sell us tickets to the island, we stalked off to a tourist-information to figure out what was going on, and found that we couldn’t go to the island because it was hotel guests only. From there we stalked back to the guards to find that we could buy afternoon tea on the palace that went up to the water. We bought the tickets for high tea, went up to the palace and were told that high tea was full and that we should go to the pool to be served. We went to the pool to find that there was not high tea, or anything vaguely like high tea, going on. The waiter who spoke English pointed out to us that there was no high tea anywhere in the palace and that we had been over charged by 500 rupees (approximately 30 rupees to the dollar) for our admission fee. We called the manager; sat in an office for a half hour while we argued with the guards over the fact that we had been overcharged 500 and that there was no extra money in the cash box. Mom screamed (editorial comment from “mom”… I did not scream, I spoke to them firmly!)  at them for pocketing the money off of tourists and after sitting in the office for another hour and a half waiting for the top manager (and reading a very interesting article on Alice and Wonderland in the news paper) we decided just to leave. Mom had to go over and “yell” at the guards on our way out one more time about the principle of the thing before we left.

(caption by Kate)  We didn't really want to go their dumb ole island palace anyway, we found a perfectly lovely place to have dinner and watch the sun set that was WAY better than the palace.  AND they didn't try an rip us off for $60 bucks!  So there!  :-)

(caption by Kate) We didn't really want to go their dumb ole island palace anyway, we found a perfectly lovely place to have dinner and watch the sun set that was WAY better than the palace. AND they didn't try an rip us off for $60 bucks! So there! :-)

The road to Idar

So from Udupur, we sardine packed back into our car and set out for the Jain temple halfway in between.

It was better than the Taj Mahal and it deserves more recognition.

One hundred and forty four pillars of intricately and uniquely carved white marble laid out symmetrically house small statues of Jain gods and large 600 year old trees. An aura of peace falls over the place in the sunlight and the high priests come to give free tours and practice their English.

The Jain Temple.  It was AWESOME!  Every single inch of the entire place was intricately carved, and it was massive.  Our tour guide was the head priest and we learned so much about their religion, it was really interesting!

The Jain Temple. It was AWESOME! Every single inch of the entire place was intricately carved, and it was massive. Our tour guide was the head priest and we learned so much about their religion, it was really interesting!

Later on that day, our driver was so pleased that we had enjoyed the wonder of the Jain temple, that he brought us to another one, unaware that today was a holy day and that there was going to be a giant throng of people going to this green temple which was still in use. We were followed by a giant mass of people until gawking citizens cleared a way in our path for our giant parade. We had small boys following us with arrows*, a group of guys about 20 who were making kissy faces at my mom and I, a little group of beggars and a small group of giggling girls that wanted to pet our hair. We went in to the temple, and I tried my best to avoid the people blessing you with the wet yellow bindies (the smell makes me nauseous) as we were shoved and pushed through the crowd.

*WHAT WERE SMALL 8 YEAR OLDS DOING WITH ARROWS?

This is at the green marble temple.  She how my dad and Phoebe have yellow dots (blessings) on their foreheads?  One, the yellow stuff stinks (gag!) and, two, they ask you to tip them - what's up with that?  Eveyone wants a tip in India!

This is at the green marble temple. She how my dad and Phoebe have yellow dots (blessings) on their foreheads? One, the yellow stuff stinks (gag!) and, two, they ask you to tip them - what's up with that? Eveyone wants a tip in India!

Idar

So we arrived at Idar late in the afternoon. I didn’t feel good and was sick for the rest of our stay there. I had a fever and the sniffles. Where does all the snot come from? It’s a mystery to me. Poor Metoo, Jeshal, Raj, and Dolly had to deal with me being sick and not wanting to go to temples the whole time we were at their house. They dragged me around with them in the car and I had a strange craving for only fruit. So I ate watermelon for the week we stayed with them.

They drove us to Ahmadabad the day we were leaving so that we could go to UAE. In the time before our flight we went to the malls and tried to find a DDR machine without success.

We left India with a sigh the next day.


2 Responses  
Miranda writes:
April 20th, 2010 at 9:34 am

HIIIIIIlarious!

Ms. Lisa writes:
May 25th, 2010 at 3:20 pm

Tessa,

Your blogs and particularly your captions gave me the biggest chuckle I’ve had in awhile. Many thanks!

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