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The pyramids
May 2nd, 2010 by Tessa

tessa w big pyr

Camels are very terrifying creatures. Especially when you step out of the van with one 10 yards away, which is about as close as I ever wanted to be to a camel. Or will ever want to be. They have two knees, look like they’re skin is too big for them, have a jiggling lump on their back, and their pelt looks like if you go up and pet them you’ll get a handful of grimy, sweaty and possibly snotty fist of sand. They constantly seem to be staring at you as if your fingers are a kind of vegetable, that they know will taste horrible, but deep down must be good for you. They also stand much taller then you’d think. Of course, their 12 feet tall, but when they say 12 feet tall, you don’t except that that’s probably tall enough for a horse to walk under. The camel was so disgusting you couldn’t look away from it, which of course caused the guy holding it’s reins to walk over to our little brigade and ask multiple times if I wanted to get on and ride the camel to take a picture (Not trying to follow Jay Staats example, So I shall NOT ride the camels at the pyramids). I had to wrench my eyes from the monstrosity to look at the pyramids.

They looked- different then I was expecting… They didn’t seem to be the correct size, although I couldn’t remember whether they were smaller then I thought they’d be or larger. They also didn’t look the same size if you stepped forwards. 20 yards away from a dog, you can tell it’s about the size of a coffee table. If you walk 10 yards towards it, it still looks the size of a coffee table. 10 yards back from my current position, I would have said “It looks small,” where as, at my current position I was thinking “Huh that’s strange it suddenly seems larger now.” Within ten more yards I would abruptly stop, look up and have to rethink my whole perspective of it once more because it was now MUCH larger then it had seemed earlier, as if the dog that looked like the size of a coffee table 20 yards away suddenly looked the size of a horse 5 yards closer, and then suddenly looked like a house 5 yards away from it; maybe it was the sand dunes playing tricks on the eyes.

I also expected it to be somewhat smooth. They looked so much different from the ones in the movies, that I think they might have photo-shopped the imagery in the movie. Surprisingly, the best comparison I could come up with for them was the picture on the dollar bill. All I could think of is that someone could make a fortune selling tickets to rock climb those. It’d be a huge seller and would make enough money to repair any damage to the pyramid and more. They’re the perfect size and even a total beginner really couldn’t fall off of them.

On our way to the next pyramid in the famous chain, we stopped by the sphinx. The sphinx has a very long history as our guide informed us. It was originally a cliff that one of the pharaohs decided to carve to make his pyramid’s front look more beautiful. Turns out the nose is missing because napoleon decided to blow it off as a joke. The guide let us stop and offered to take our picture kissing the sphinx. Who can say no to that?

At the next pyramid, my dad and I decided to go into the tomb. We went down a very small hole in the side of the pyramid at a steep decline. The experience was very good practice for crawling through vents, which I one day might need to know as part of my ninja training.

We went down, through a small corridor, up to the chamber, where we were in a very stuffy room. Knowing I could be cursed, I took off my bracelet and waved it around me in a circle before putting it back on. It’d have to do.

We walked back through and emerged into the light, where our guide pushed us along back to the van.

Isn't that just great? You can see up its nose...

Isn't that just great? You can see up its nose...

girls w pyr

Phoebe’s Photo Journal of Johdipur
Apr 15th, 2010 by Kate

I kept saying, “Mom, Mom, can I have the camera”.

We walked back to our hotel through the market and I saw so many things that I wanted to take pictures of such as cows with crazy horns, ladies in saffron robes pushing carts of raisins, and tiny little stores with men in them selling anything you could imagine!  These are a few of the pictures I took…

These are only 20 of the 183 cows I counted on the street near our hotel.

These are only 20 of the 183 cows I counted on the street near our hotel.

There were raisin carts everywhere, as well as bread slice carts and fruit carts.  I like the hussle and bustle of this street!

There were raisin carts everywhere, as well as bread slice carts and fruit carts. I like the hussle and bustle of this street!

Come to Raisin Mountain Charlie!

Come to Raisin Mountain Charlie!

Even in the middle of the city, the woman in brightly colored sarri's look like tropical birds.

Even in the middle of the city, the woman in brightly colored sarri's look like tropical birds.

In the cities in India, there are little tiny shops that sell everything from paint...

In the cities in India, there are little tiny shops that sell everything from paint...

... to rope...

... to rope...

In America, a load this big would be put in the back of a truck, but in India they just say "put it on your head for heaven's sake"

In America, a load this big would be put in the back of a truck, but in India they just say "put it on your head for heaven's sake"

A pretty mom with the bread slice cart behind her.

A pretty mom with the bread slice cart behind her.

Married people wear bangles, little girls wear bangles, everybody EVERYBODY wears bangles.  Its crazy.  You can buy about 10 of these bangles for 50 rupee or one American dollar.  I love them.

Married people wear bangles, little girls wear bangles, everybody EVERYBODY wears bangles. Its crazy. You can buy about 10 of these bangles for 50 rupee or one American dollar. I love them.

Fabric merchant's shop

Fabric merchant's shop

In India, some people put eyeliner on the little babies because they think it makes their eyes look bigger.  But their eyes are big to begin with!

In India, some people put eyeliner on the little babies because they think it makes their eyes look bigger. But their eyes are big to begin with!

These kids were on my street washing their hands in the public faucet.  I wanted to take their picture, but they wanted their picture taken WITH me and not BY me.  So my mom took it.  They look more like American kids then most of the kids I saw in India.

These kids were on my street washing their hands in the public faucet. I wanted to take their picture, but they wanted their picture taken WITH me and not BY me. So my mom took it. They look more like American kids then most of the kids I saw in India.

This was the secret door leading to our hotel.  From the street you had to crunch between a flower merchant and a store selling pots and pans to get to the stairs that led up to the entrance.  It was actually a Hari Krishna temple, but half of it was converted to a hotel.  I was really surprised to find this nice little quiet garden in the middle of the crazy city.  My mom said the place had amazing potential.

This was the secret door leading to our hotel. From the street you had to crunch between a flower merchant and a store selling pots and pans to get to the stairs that led up to the entrance. It was actually a Hari Krishna temple, but half of it was converted to a hotel. I was really surprised to find this nice little quiet garden in the middle of the crazy city. My mom said the place had amazing potential.

I took about a million more pictures, but that’s all I’m going to post for now.

Spray it with bug spray, tuck it in, and pray nothing gets in!
Mar 19th, 2010 by Tessa

“Who has the key?” Phoebe asked automatically as she stepped onto the wooden porch, that really didn’t deserve the right to be called a porch. It was really a bunch of wooden planks nailed to the underside of our cottage with a railing on the edge that would probably drag you down with it if you touched it. The house was on stilts and overlooked the sea. The builders must have been pressed for space because they had decided to build our cottage over the rocks leading into the water. We were IN the rocks to the point that one of our walls was half of the boulder that the right side of our cottage leaned on. Dad, leaned against the boulder and mom sat on the chair on the porch. We spilled into the room like a wave of water spills onto the sand. Dad quickly flicked on the fan and I climbed up into the loft that was serving as our room. I grabbed my book off the ladder on my way up.

My mattress was on the floor, so I took a special care in tucking in my mosquito net in to keep the cockroaches out. I stuffed the mosquito net farther under so that the mattress weighed the sides down. I was not tolerating any bugs tonight. I folded the mosquito net neatly behind me so that the entrance overlapped. I swung my legs under the covers. I paused just long enough for a seven inch brown rat to bolt out from under the blankets, run up my arm, over my shoulder and into the mosquito net behind me. I watched it flailing in the net from across the room.

“Wow,” Phoebe said from the top of the ladder, “You just FLEW across the room.”

Swimmming with the Wild Seals
Feb 16th, 2010 by Phoebe

Swimming with the WIld Seals

By Phoebe Wells

 

Frigid water crashes on the shore

Dark as a rain cloud

Thick as a misty day.

Monsterous waves rolling on top

of me crashing with foam.

 

Kelp clinging to the rock

Flowing like hair

Of a sea Medusa.

 

Rocks moody grey

Coated in bird droppings

Small shrubs cling on.

 

Seals glide through the water

Slick and smooth

Barking with joy

Graceful in the water

 

Just within reach

Happiness

But nervous as I look

Into their soulful eyes.

“Look at the sea lion, this must be where he lives” (sung to the opening tune of the National Geographic TV show)
Jan 30th, 2010 by Kate

We bid farewell to the Castle/McLean clan and boarded the ferry to Wellington.  All the other times we have taken ferries it’s just been us, but this time we got to drive our car onto it.  Cool.

Driving onto the ferry - it carried about 50 cars and about a dozen big trucks.  After you park, you go up on deck and hang out in the bar - they had the Cardinal's game on!

Driving onto the ferry - it carried about 50 cars and about a dozen big trucks. After you park, you go up on deck and hang out in the bar - they had the Cardinal's game on!

The trip over wasn’t rough really, but the waves were large and rolling and we all felt a little green.  We shared our motion sickness pills with some Americans who were cycling the entire length of New Zealand in preparation for the Iron Man Triatholon in Hawaii.  One of the guys was an ER doc from Scottsdale Osborn – funny small world.  I can’t remember his name exactly but it said it rhymed with Bethleham… anyway…

Olivia & Phoebe sleeping off their motion sickness pill in the back of our luxurious "Sunny Salon" economy car.  This is how we traveled for the whole month - jammed in this tiny car - we looked clowns getting out of it!

Olivia & Phoebe sleeping off their motion sickness pill in the back of our luxurious "Sunny Salon" economy car. This is how we traveled for the whole month - jammed in this tiny car - we looked clowns getting out of it!

Phoebe "hiking" in Kiakoura

Phoebe "hiking" in Kiakoura

We are on a hike on the point outside of Kiakoura.  The bluff we are on is about 300 feet above the water in a pasture with sheep and there is quite a shear cliff behind us - good thing sheep aren't like lemming!

We are on a hike on the point outside of Kiakoura. The bluff we are on is about 300 feet above the water in a pasture with sheep and there is quite a shear cliff behind us - good thing sheep aren't like lemming!

Our plan was to head from the port up in Picton on the northern tip of the south island down along the east coast.  Our first stop was Kiakoura, a city known for its whales, dolphins, and seals. 

We weren’t disappointed.  As we headed along the main road (one of only 2 roads heading south on the ENTIRE island – and it is like a 2 lane country road – I am not kidding) we saw a huge colony of seals right on the beach!  We got out and were able to get pretty close while still respecting their space.  There were a ton of baby seals too, and we spent quite a while watching them.  Totally cool.

This is the coastline driving south along the eastern side of the island - all the sand is black! Totally beautiful!

This is the coastline driving south along the eastern side of the island - all the sand is black! Totally beautiful!

Our first seal spotting!

Our first seal spotting!

After checking out all of our “animal sighting options” in Kiakoura, we decided to actually go swimming with the seals out in the ocean off of a sea mammal and ocean bird preserve.  Phoebe is currently working on a poem about our swim with the seals, and the photos are still in the underwater camera that we bought for the occasion, but let me just say that the water was 51 degrees, we had to wear 2-3 wetsuits and hoodies each, and the preserve was a good mile off the coast in deep grey (freaky) water with massive (the world’s largest) spaghetti-like kelp.  BUT, it was like TOTALLY BEING IN A NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MOVIE!

Not our National Geo swim with the seals, but it was still fun to poise with this sleeping lump of cuteness!

Not our National Geo swim with the seals, but it was still fun to poise with this sleeping lump of cuteness!

Critters down under, and even further down under
Jan 11th, 2010 by Phoebe

When we first came to Australia we stayed on a farm, and they had alpacas, cows, dogs, chickens (aka “Chucks”), dogs, cats and a lot of macadamia nut trees.

This is me and Ian feeding the bull!  Nice bull.

This is me and Ian feeding the bull! Nice bull.

This was their big French Bull.  There were 150 girl cows and only one bull.  I got to mix up his feed.  He was SO big that I was scared of him, but he was really nice and let me pet him when he was eating.

Aren't they SO cute!!!

Aren't they SO cute!!!

Next are the alpacas.  Alpacas are like small llamas but they don’t spit as much, they are very skittish, and their fur is really soft.  Alpacas like water, so when you spray them with the hose they are happy.

The rooster at the farm didn’t do his cockle-do’s early in the morning, he did them once everyone woke up so that was really nice.

One time in the morning Ian (the owner of the farm) moved the cows into the pasture behind the house.  The moowing was so loud that my mom woke up because she thought there was a cow on the back porch.

This is my favorite calf Lucky.

This is my favorite calf Lucky.

My favorite cow was a calf named Lucky.  Her mom died after she was born so we needed to hand feed her and she was very nice.  I helped mix up her milk, and after she was done eating if I would run along side her paddock she would chase me.  She also liked to lick me and her super long tongue was like sandpaper and she could wrap her whole tongue around my arm.  If my cousin Jack was an animal I think he would be a cow because he also has a super long tongue and can touch his tongue to his nose.

Me feeding Lucky.  I gave her a bucketful of milk twice a day.  She would stick her whole head in the bucket and get milk all the way up to her ears!  It was SO funny.  Sorry I didn't get a picture!

Me feeding Lucky. I gave her a bucketful of milk twice a day. She would stick her whole head in the bucket and get milk all the way up to her ears! It was SO funny. Sorry I didn't get a picture!

On the farm their were cuckobara birds who have a really loud evil sounding laugh.  Tessa sang the Cukubara  song that we learned back in Ms Pams class like a thousand times.  We also saw ibus, and they have really long beaks that they use to get grubs out of the ground.

Then we went to Brisbane and went to a koala reserve and I got to hold a koala.  Koalas are marsupials, which means they have a pouch.  They don’t get much energy from their food so they sleep a lot.  They eat only eucalyptus leaves (aka “Gum Tree leaves”), and they only eat the tips of the leaves.  There are 80 types, and they use their nose to decide which kinds to eat.  The males have white chests and have special oils that they leave on the trees to mark their territories.  Every koala looks different.  Some have dots on their backs, some of their noses look different, and their ears might have long fur or short fur.  When I held the koala, it felt very heavy for how small it was, and its fur felt very dense, thick and soft.

Me and the koala!

Me and the koala!

This is a kangaroo - see how its much bigger.  Tessa was hoping they'd be big enough to ride but their not.

This is a kangaroo - see how its much bigger. Tessa was hoping they'd be big enough to ride but their not.

Next we went in to a kangaroo enclosure and got to walk around and feed the kangaroos and wallabees.  We got to feed a baby kangaroo and pet it.  Baby kangaroos are called “joeys”.  One of the joeys was too big for its mom’s pouch but it still climbed in.  It went in head first and then turned itself around but it was so big its head, back legs and tail hung out.  It was totally folded in half and looked really funny.

See the joey folded in half in the pouch?  Its head has the ears pointing down, its legs are behind the head, and its tail is behind the foot.  Poor mama roo!

See the joey folded in half in the pouch? Its head has the ears pointing down, its legs are behind the head, and its tail is behind the foot. Poor mama roo!

Our friend Nick told us that the kangaroo is the national animal of Australia and that they are the only country that eat their national symbol.

At the sanctuary there were also a lot of wild turkeys walking around.  We also saw really big lizards and wambats.  Tessa thinks they are adorable.  I think they look like furry pigs with falt furry snouts, but I do have to admit that they are cute.

In Australia, they protect everything – koalas, turkeys, and even crows.  It seems that the only thing you are allowed to kill is the cane toad.  (Not that I was looking from something to kill)

Next we went to Noosa heads and there I saw a giant hunter spider.  If you spread out your fingers, it went from finger tip to finger tip but they are harmless.  I did learn though that 9 of the 10 most deadly animals in the world are from Australia, like the box jellyfish, the blue ringed octopus, and a bunch of their snakes.

We are now in New Zealand and it is the weirdest thing – they didn’t have any land mammals until the Maoris brought some over, and then the Europeans brought more.  So far I have been to a bunch of museums here in New Zealand so I have seen a LOT of stuffed animals.  The only real animals I have seen are cows and SHEEP!  There are sheep everywhere!

I will take some pictures of them and post them soon!  Bye!

What are you talking about? That water is BELOW freezing!
Dec 9th, 2009 by Tessa
Dad and I diving "Rico's Wall" at about 12 meters - check out my awesome 5mil wetsuit - I was STILL FREEZING!

Dad and I diving "Rico's Wall" at about 12 meters - check out my awesome 5mil wetsuit - I was STILL FREEZING!

I was in debate on whether I should write about my scuba diving adventures or not- because, frankly, scuba diving doesn’t make for the most entertaining subject. But due to lack of ANYTHING ELSE super funny happening in the last couple of weeks, (besides the fork episode, of which I will post next) I will proceed to inform (and hopefully mildly entertain) you on the vast array of scuba diving equipment.

To start off, they give you a book. In the 3 hours I had before I went to bed, I had to read 175 pages of- not exactly the funniest book I’ve read (but the dive instructor did complement me on my artistic talent that I displayed on the margins- he also commented on my notes arguing with the ways they explained the laws of gravity and my notes saying that liquids, could indeed be solidified under extremely high pressures that caused them to compress. He responded by saying we were not going anywhere that was near absolute zero, so I would have no need to worry.). I then went back to the dive center and watched 3 hours of factual “how to take off your mask” videos that were periodically interrupted by a tourist on the screen (obviously an ignorant American ^_~) doing all of the WRONG things.

In the afternoon I was told to do 200m of straight laps and then tread water for 10 minutes. After passing both of those, they tossed the mass of equipment into the pool and had me demonstrate the skills I had learned on the tape/reading the book.

Finally on the second day we (my dad the instructor and I) headed out to the REAL Ocean. The sea churned the in the same way someone would imagine a witches pot to. The gray sky started to drizzle, and everyone moved to the back of the boat to avoid the spray of the waves that lashed out like arms over the front of the boat. Everyone suited up in there 3 millimeter wetsuits, and I got into my 5millimeter. My dad informed me on more then one occasion that 5millimeters weren’t for tropical oceans, they were for places like; quote: “I don’t know CANADA?” I told him that if I was ever going to go diving in Canada, I would have a custom made arctic dry suit. The dive instructor thought that was really funny. He also laughed at my habit of eating butter right out of the container or having butter, a can of tuna and a bushel of leechee nuts as my lunch everyday.

On the dive trip (once I got used to how COLD the water was) we practiced dive routines like filling up my mask and clearing it, The CESA, and calculating how long we could stay underwater without freezing too much nitrogen in our blood so that when we go up to the surface it doesn’t boil in our veins (charming- isn’t it?). We didn’t see much because we were practicing our emergency routines.

The next day, we had to get our equipment read ourselves. So I got all of my stuff (fins, goggles, snorkel, BCD, butter, leechees, wetsuit, etc.) and put it on the boat. If yesterday the witch was churning the ocean, today she was whirling it with a mad passion, laughing hysterically at the poor little people on boats. The sea frothed and I suddenly felt bad for the people who had to stay on the boat while we dived… And for the 20 people sitting on, what looked like a small bamboo raft that was being paddled out to the sea. Well… that was Vietnam for you.

The visibility was horrible that day, and my dad says we passed by him quite a few times before we actually SAW him. Never the less, the ocean was very beautiful (and cold, but also beautiful). Plus, we weren’t actually scuba diving for pleasure; we were more scuba diving to get me certified so that in better places (in BETTER weather) I could go scuba diving with my dad- which is exactly what we did in the Philippines.

A coral head in the Philippines - check out all the zillions of little tropical fish in the background!

A coral head in the Philippines - check out all the zillions of little tropical fish in the background!

"I shall call him Squishy, and he shall be mine!"  (a sea slug really, but isn't he cute!)

"I shall call him Squishy, and he shall be mine!" (a sea slug really, but isn't he cute!)

The Philippines was wonderful! The sea was clear- the locals had a fishing law so the reefs were protected! Boulders of brain coral anchored themselves to the sandy plains. Fields of anemone like animals thrived over table coral and colorful fish meander across the sun like swift silver clouds. It was almost as wonderful as hanging up silk curtains of every color all right next to each other, and then standing right behind them while the wind picked them up and swirled them around you.

There were this many fish (sometimes more!) everywhere you swam.  The colors were insane!

There were this many fish (sometimes more!) everywhere you swam. The colors were insane!

At some points I just wanted to lay down in the water at the bottom of ocean, feeling weightless and fall asleep, but I knew that that was one of the signs of multiple illnesses related to diving, and that everyone would freak out if I just stopped moving. We spent the rest of the afternoon in the Philippines hanging out on the boat and laying in the sun. It was a good day.

A Frog Fish.  These apparently are really rare.

A Frog Fish. These apparently are really rare.

This was eely eely cool

This was eely eely cool

Lion fish:  Pretty and DEADLY (dun dun dun...)

Lion fish: Pretty and DEADLY (dun dun dun...)

A good day on the water!

A good day on the water!

Pandas, pandas, and more…
Oct 31st, 2009 by Phoebe
At the Chengdu Panda Reserve

At the Chengdu Panda Reserve

Yesterday (editor’s note – this actually happened on Oct 17th, but we are a bit behind in posting!), Tessa, Dad and I went to see the pandas.  Since we went there we learned that there are only 1000 pandas currently existing in the wild.  Pandas are very interesting.  Did you now that if pandas have two babies typically only one will survive? Also female pandas are only fertile 2-3 days every year.

A baby panda in an incubator.  Some of the babies were even smaller than this but I couldn't really get pictures of them.

A baby panda in an incubator. Some of the babies were even smaller than this but I couldn't really get pictures of them.

 Pandas are very playful animals.  When we went to see them they were climbing and swinging.  I had so much fun.  Pandas, unlike other animals have a projection in their wrist which works as an opposing thumb.  It helps them eat their food.

Two pandas wrestling.  They were very playful and really fun to watch!

Two pandas wrestling. They were very playful and really fun to watch!

 Pandas live in the bamboo forests of China.  Pandas eat about 80 different types of Bamboo but prefer 27 types. Since people are moving into the panda’s habitat they are becoming extinct.

This panda was climbing up to poke and bother another panda. He was a trouble maker!

This panda was climbing up to poke and bother another panda. He was a trouble maker!

 The “red pandas” were also in the Chengdu Panda Reserve even though they are in the fox family not really in the panda family.  I thought that the red pandas were less playful than the real pandas.  They have a mane-like fur around their head and have striped tails. A “Red Panda” is not really a panda but they are still really cute!

"Red Panda" isn't it SO cute!

"Red Panda" isn't it SO cute!

The day before I went to the Chengdu Zoo and they had one panda there and he was laying on his back with bamboo piled up on his belly and was eating away.  He was the panda version of Homer Simpson.  We also saw a huge tiger called a Siberian Tiger and it was much much bigger than the other tigers.  We also saw an elephant that was so so big we almost didn’t believe it was a real elephant. 

 

I think the pandas get more room in the zoo because the Chinese people honor them more, but the tigers were in 12 x 20 foot concrete cage and they were all pacing and did not seem very happy.  I was very sad for the cats.  There were also bears.  They were very cute.  The fur around their head was like a big big puffy mane.  When they walked on their back leg they wobbled and hobbled because they had very short back legs.  The enclosure were very wide open and anyone could fall in very easily.  The walls of the enclosures had big slits in them so kids could put their feet in them and look over the low wall.  All of the bears were begging for food and many people were throwing them junk food, which is very bad for them.  The big Asian black bears could catch the food out of the air but the Sun Bears could not and the food bonked them in the head.

Miyajima & the Itsukushima Shrine
Sep 27th, 2009 by Kate
Miyajima O-tori

Miyajima O-tori

I have found my favorite Shinto shrine.  Okay, it’s probably a lot of people’s favorite Shinto shrine, but hey, it’s just that beautiful!

 Miyajima is an island in the Seto Sea west of Hiroshima.  Like many things in nature, it (the island) is considered sacred by practicioners of Shinto.  As not to disturb the sacred island, the Itsukushima Shrine was constructed in the water leading up to the island.  Originally built in the 6th century and then remodeled into the current style in 1168, the shrine, and it’s o-tori (gate leading into a shrine) were constructed on low stilts above the water – so whole place looks like it is floating on the water during high tide.  The o-tori is located about 200 meters from the shrine (further out to sea), so it ends up being about 300 meters from land when the tide is in – such a sight!  The entire shrine is painted vermillion (an orangey red color that seems to be a rather popular color for shrines and such) and set against the water and the greenery of the island’s mountains it looks quite spectacular.  In a country choked-full of shrines, this one is outstanding-in-its-field (or should I stay outstanding-in-the-water). 

 And to make our visit to Miyajima even more memorable, our friend Yoshie (of Yokohama fame) asked her friend in Hiroshima, Keiko, to accompany us on our visit that day.  Keiko (and her daughter Yoko) were wonderful tour guides and hostesses.  We learned more about Shinto shrines in one morning than we would have learned reading a million guide books.  They showed us around, treated us to the local delicacies (eel and maple leaf shaped cookies – not eaten together of course) and only laughed at us a little when we got accosted by the local deer (who knew deer could smell popcorn through your backpack!).  We were honored that Keiko and Yoko took time out of their busy schedules to play tour guides – they truly made or time in Miyajima memorable and we look forward to playing tour guide for them in Phoenix someday.

Jeff and HIS minions... Tessa eat your heart out!

Jeff and HIS minions... Tessa eat your heart out!

critters
Sep 24th, 2009 by Phoebe

wild,crazy,attak,MONKEYS

koi lots and lots

at the monkey park thses monkeys were wild and not in a cage

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